Saturday, 19 January 2013

Restless Revolutionaries revisited

Some years ago I wrote a set of rules entitled RESTLESS REVOLUTIONARIES: RULES FOR WARGAMING LATE 19TH AND EARLY 20TH CENTURY SOUTH AMERICAN WARS AND REVOLUTIONS. Included in the rules was the outline for a mini-campaign, and fighting the two battles set during the Rusland Civil War made me realise that – with a little bit of adjustment – the mini-campaign could be used for most modern-ish civil wars where the opposing forces were very similar in terms of equipment, training, and motivation – usually poor equipment, no training, but high motivation!

The main inspirations for the rules and the mini-campaign were:
These were very eclectic collection of ‘sources’, but all of them provided different and very interesting views of revolutions.

The Mini-Campaign 'Map'
The map is a linear path that the opponents move up and down. The mini-campaign starts when the 'revolution' breaks out in the Regional Capital, and if successful it ends when the 'revolutionaries' are victorious in the battle to win the Capital City. Between those two events both sides will fight – sometimes several times – for the Provincial Capital and the Railway.


Notes on the Scenario Maps
The maps that accompany each scenario are guides as to how the terrain should be set up. It is not necessary to slavishly reproduce them in detail as the terrain each battle is fought over will vary according to the models and terrain features that players have available. They are merely included as a guide.

The Armies
The original rules contained a simple points system for generating each side's army. I have modified it so that it can be used with my PORTABLE WARGAME rules, but please feel free to ignore it and use your own method.

Armies for each scenario are generated in the following way. Each side gets a fixed number of points per scenario plus extra points that are generated by D6 dice. The number of D6 dice thrown is indicated for each scenario. The total score achieved by each side is the number of points they will have to ‘buy’ troops. The defenders always roll fewer dice than the attackers, but this does not guarantee that they will have more troops!

The following rules apply to the process of ‘buying’ troops:
  • ‘Elite’ Units cost 2 points.
  • ‘Average’ troops cost 1.5 points.
  • ‘Poor’ troops cost 1 point.
  • There must be at least 3 ‘Average’ or ‘Poor’ Units for every ‘Elite’ Unit in a Revolutionary army.
  • There must be at least 2 ‘Average’ or ‘Poor’ Units for every ‘Elite’ Unit in a Government army.
  • There must be at least 4 Infantry or Cavalry Units for every Artillery Unit in an army.
  • There must be at least 3 Infantry or Cavalry Units for every Machine Gun Unit in an army.
The Regional Capital
All revolutions need to start somewhere, and the Regional Capital is as good place as any to start.

This scenario deals with the capture of a Regional Capital from which the 'revolutionaries' can operate safely as they begin their war against the present Government.


Revolutionary troops (Attacking):
  • 4 + 2D6 of points
  • Enter via any of the right hand row of squares.
Government troops (Defending):
  • 4 + 1D6 of points
  • Set up in any of the central or left hand rows of squares.
Revolutionary troops (Defending):
  • 4 + 1D6 of points
  • Enter via any of the left hand row of squares.
Government troops (Attacking):
  • 4 + 2D6 of points
  • Set up in any of the central or right hand rows of squares.
The Provincial Capital
All revolutions need a power base, and the capture of a Provincial Capital will provide one.

This scenario deals with the capture of a Provincial Capital from which the 'revolutionaries' can begin to seriously threaten the present Government.


Revolutionary troops (Attacking):
  • 6 + 2D6 of points
  • Enter at A.
Government troops (Defending):
  • 6 + 1D6 of points
  • Set up in the middle 2 squares.
Revolutionary troops (Defending):
  • 6 + 1D6 of points
  • Set up in the middle 2 squares.
Government troops (Attacking):
  • 6 + 2D6 of points
  • Enter at B.
The Railway
Railways always play a vital role in revolutions, as they are usually the only fast and effective means of transport. If you control the railway you stand a good chance of winning the revolution.

This scenario deals with the capture of a vital railway station, in which might be a train capable of taking the 'revolutionaries' to the capital city.


Revolutionary troops (Attacking):
  • 8 + 2D6 of points
  • Enter at A.
Government troops (Defending):
  • 8 + 1D6 of points
  • Set up in the middle 2 squares.
Revolutionary troops (Defending):
  • 8 + 1D6 of points
  • Set up in the middle 2 squares.
Government troops (Attacking):
  • 8 + 2D6 of points
  • Enter at B.
The Capital City
Victory for the revolution is now in sight. All the 'revolutionaries' have to do is to capture the Presidential Palace, the Model Prison, and the Main Barracks, all of which are in the centre of the Capital City.


Revolutionary troops (Attacking):
  • 10 + 2D6 of points
  • Enter at A.
Government troops (Defending):
  • 10 + 1D6 of points
  • Set up inside any squares that contain buildings.

12 comments:

  1. A nice little set up that looks just the ticket for such a campaign.

    I could see substituting or adding other tables to be crossed for particular campaign a mountain pass perhaps (Shipka?) or a river crossing.

    One could also include some chance of an ambush of the attacker en route on a random table in between objectives, player choice in a 2 player or a random event in a solo game.

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  2. Ross Mac,

    You have made some excellent suggestions that could easily be incorporated into this sort of mini-campaign. My hope is that someone will take my basic mini-campaign idea and adapt/use it themselves.

    All the best,

    Bob

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  3. Nice idea and I would be very reluctant to clutter it. Is there perhaps some way of providing some continuity between games, beyond the linked map. One could carry casualties over I suppose.

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  4. Conrad Kinch,

    It is perfectly possible to allow both sides to carry their casualties over from one battle to another, although it should also be possible for them to 'recruit' additional troops as they become more successful ... and to lose them as things get worse.

    All the best,

    Bob

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  5. Hi Bob,

    I reckon this would be a great tool to use for the frequent limited objective border incursions between Fezia and Rusland.

    These generally fall short of all out war but are still taken pretty seriously by all concerned.

    All the best,

    DC

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  6. Nice campaign. I think it could work well for horse and musket too ala Simon Bolivar.

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  7. Now, like many, I have had some dreadful "bug" since christmas but it really is no excuse......every time I have checked the blog up came Charlie Sweet - taking a christmas break I assumed. But no! What a flurry of exiting developments I have missed. It will take a while to digest it all but it looks to be time that will be well spent - starting now.......

    BC.

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  8. David Crook,

    What a very good idea ... and one that lends itself to the small 'border actions' that never quite develop into full-scale wars. It could easily be adapted to most Colonial confrontations as well.

    All the best,

    Bob

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  9. Sean,

    Although it was originally designed for the end of the 19th/beginning of the 20th centuries, there is no reason why something similar could not be developed for almost all historical periods.

    All the best,

    Bob

    ReplyDelete
  10. Barry Carter,

    I have also been unwell, but have managed to boost my morale with lots of blogging and wargaming ... so you have missed quite a bit.

    Be warned, like the snow there is more on the way!

    All the best,

    Bob

    ReplyDelete
  11. Hi Bob

    I can see use for this in my Winter of 79 setting, VBCW, Che Guevara in Cuba, SCW, even Marquis trying to liberate a French arrondissement/district in 1944.....

    Mmm got me thinking.

    Cheers
    Mark

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  12. Mark,

    You seem to have lots of good ideas that you can develop from my simple concept. I look forward to seeing how you take them forward.

    All the best,

    Bob

    ReplyDelete