Sunday, 21 December 2014

Going Loco: Part 3: A flatbed wagon

I used the passenger carriage that came with the train set as the basis of the flatbed wagon.


I removed the wheels (they popped out quite easily) ...


... and I then used a razor saw to carefully remove the false wheels that were moulded onto the carriage's wheel flanges.


Using the moulded line just below the windows as a guide, I carefully sawed the top of the carriage away from bottom half and couplings.


The top of the carriage was put to one side. (I might find a use for it later.)

I then glued two 6cm-long pieces of plastic strip inside the frame of the carriage to strengthen it and to provide something to glue the floor of the wagon to.


Once the glue had cured, I carefully cut a piece of Plasticard to the right size, and glued it in place.


The main re-modelling work on the carriage was now complete, and the flatbed wagon was ready to be painted.

6 comments:

  1. Would you have been better off getting some cheap 'proper' model railway wagons or kits?

    There just seems to be so much work required to get decent results from a piece of tat and you could save yourself so much time and effort by spending a few more pounds.

    It is something I am only coming round to myself and I find it hard but sometimes the bin is the best place for something.

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  2. Re Michael's comment, isn't the making of it half the fun? I am currently turning some old Lone Star train components into an armoured train and thoroughly enjoying myself!
    Anyway, 'proper' train models aren't that cheap!

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  3. Michael Blair,

    I had considered using existing model railway stuff to make my wargaming railway but I wouldn't have had the same amount of fun as I have had doing this ... and this was a lot cheaper as well! So far I have spent about as much as a single cheap reailway wagon would have cost me.

    All the best,

    Bob

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  4. Ian Dury,

    I feel the same way you do. I have fun doing the modelling and get satisfaction turning what is a cheap toy into something useful.

    All the best,

    Bob

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  5. Hi Bob,

    The extra advantage of this approach is that should it go horribly wrong then aside from time the monetary lose is really small.

    They are starting to look really good and I will be keen to see the finished model (after painting) in action in due course.

    All the best,

    DC

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  6. David Crook,

    Spot on! If I make any mistakes and have to junk what I have done, the worst it has cost me is £3.00 and my time. It's a bargain as far as I'm concerned.

    All the best,

    Bob

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