Monday, 1 February 2016

First Degree nerves

No wargaming for me today as I am getting ready to Initiate a new member into my Mother Lodge.

As I have mentioned before, I have been the Worshipful Master for both a Second Degree and a Third Degree ... but this is the first time I have ever Initiated someone (i.e. done the First Degree). The First Degree is quite a long piece of ritual, and although I have been able to share some of the work with other members of the Lodge, my bit is nearly 2,500 words long and has to be delivered from memory. (I do have the Immediate Past Master at my side to prompt me if and when I forget what comes next, but it is my intention to call upon his services as little as possible ... I hope!) As this is the new Initiate's first experience of Masonic ritual, it is important that it is done as well as possible, and all the Officers of the Lodge have been practicing hard to makes sure that is. It's my job to pull everything together and to make sure that it is a special day for our new Brother.

8 comments:

  1. Yes good luck...fascinating and candid little insight into the Masonic world. I still own some of my late Grandfather's Masonic medals....things of beauty as well as being heirlooms.

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  2. I hope that everything goes well for everyone, Bob.


    -- Jeff

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  3. Jim Duncan,

    Thanks for you good wishes. The ceremony went very well, and the initiate thoroughly enjoyed himself ... as did we all. (It is a great team, and I am a very lucky Worshipful Master to have them around to help and support me.)

    All the best,

    Bob

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  4. Springinsfeld,

    I am glad that you enjoyed the brief glimpse 'behind the scenes' of The Craft. We are - in the UK - a society with secrets ... not a secret society. It does no harm to be a bit more open about what we do, both inside and outside the Lodge.

    I hope that you take great care of your grandfather's medals (we call the jewels, by the way) as they can be quite valuable. My Past Masters Jewel was made of enamelled gold, and the metal alone was worth £600 in scrap value! Whilst I held it, I had to have it specially insured. (In my Lodge these particular jewels are handed over to holders 'in trust' for seven years, at which point we pass them on to a newer Past Master.) The jewels have a special value for you anyway, but I know a lot of families who inherit Masonic regalia and have no idea of its value other than as a family heirloom.

    All the best,

    Bob

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  5. Bluebear Jeff (Jeff),

    Thanks for your kind words of support. The ceremony went very well indeed, and after the meeting had finished the Initiate couldn't stop talking about how much he enjoyed it. I managed to do my bit all right, thanks to the excellent support I had from the rest of 'my' team. They did the Lodge, themselves, and me proud.

    All the best,

    Bob

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  6. Thanks Bob...I remember they are called jewels now. I'll try and post some pictures on my blog when I find time and let you know.
    all the best Mike

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  7. Springinsfeld (Mike),

    I was told that they are called jewels rather than medals so that wearers knew that they were only to be worn on Masonic occasions, and not at other times.

    I would be very interested to see any photographs that you take, and may be able to help you to identify them. If you would like details about your grandfather's Masonic career, the Library of Freemasonry can help. They do charge non-Masons for the information and they would need some personal details.

    All the best,

    Bob

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