Friday, 27 June 2014

Painting Figures: Another experiment

I decided to have another go at painting a wargames figure ... and this time I chose a 20mm-scale World War 2 one for my experiment.

I used almost exactly the same method as I used for my recently-painted Jacklex figures ... and the result looked like this:





The Nut Brown Indian Ink does add shadowing ... but I think that the darkening effect is too great. As a result I think that I may well miss that stage of the process out when I paint my next figures.

(Note: Most of the paints I used on this figure were craft acrylic paints bought in a local craft shop. I found them to be just as easy to use as specialist modelling acrylic paints ... but they were a LOT cheaper!)

20 comments:

  1. Interesting Bob, as will be your next effort without the ink.

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  2. Hi Bob

    Great effort, and effect. But I can't help thinking that Newton Oils Burnt Umber, suitably thinned, gives a more sinister apperance. And should therefore get a morale dice advantage.

    Regards :-)

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  3. Have you tried diluting the ink at all?

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  4. In my experience, avoid craft paint metallics. They don't seem to work well on the small areas figure painters use them on. Unless things have changed in the last few years. Stick with the higher end metallics (although Testor's enamels have worked well for me in certain circumstances.

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  5. You may want to experiment with sealing the acrylic paints with a light coat of clear varnish. Sometimes acrylics will pick up to much of the ink.

    Don

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  6. I use quite a strong black ink on most of my figures but then repaint the base colours over the top. I find it to be easier than black lining. I can do some WIP shots if it would help?

    Cheers,

    Pete.

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  7. I use craft acrylics as well and have been happy enough with the result for decades. I used to like my figures darker than I do now. Nothing to do with eyes growing dim at all I'm sure.

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  8. Jim Duncan,

    I hope to try something similar - but without ink - over the next few days.

    All the best,

    Bob

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  9. Arthur,

    Burnt Umber? Not a colour I would normally have thought about using as the basis of a wash ... but certainly worth thinking about now. As to the use of the colour giving a unit an advantage ... well I'd have to see what it looked like first!

    All the best,

    Bob

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  10. Nigel Drury,

    I have tried diluting the ink, but my experiments have been a bit inconclusive so far.

    All the best,

    Bob

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  11. Stu Rat,

    Thanks for the tip. I shall certainly give metallic craft paint a miss.

    All the best,

    Bob

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  12. Brigadier Dundas (Don),

    As soon as I read your comment I remembered that is how I used to use this technique ... and it produced better results than this.

    Thanks for the tip ... and for jogging my memory.

    All the best,

    Bob

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  13. Pete,

    I have never tried that method and would appreciate some photos of how you use it.

    All the best,

    Bob

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  14. Ross Mac,

    I have been very impressed with the acrylic craft paints I have used so far ... and the range of colours available is very extensive and the cost is much lower than 'modelling' acrylic paints.

    I tend to paint over a white or light grey undercoat as it make the topcoat reflect a lighter shade than a black undercoat does.

    One problem with painting a toy soldier is that if you use the original uniform colours they look darker when seen on the tabletop. (It is something to do with the way the eye 'sees' colours at a distance.) Using lighter shades of the original colours makes them look right on the tabletop.

    All the best,

    Bob

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  15. Like Arthur, I use burnt umber and burnt sienna as washes. Standard oil paint well thinned down with white spirit (usual safety warnings apply!)
    Also, I use white or grey undercoat. Despite all the warnings I have seen that it is too thick, I find standard spray car primer works fine, though it does vary between brands
    Ian

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  16. Ian Dury,

    I am still experimenting with painting techniques and will give serious consideration to using non-ink washes.

    I am currently using white undercoat applied by brush as I don't have anywhere that I can use a spray-on primer/undercoat.

    All the best,

    Bob

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  17. For the W&N inks I've used burnt sienna, nut brown and ink brown as washes. I've also tried adding small amounts of green and/or brown ink to PVA glue when flocking terrain pieces with some success and will carry on experimenting with this.

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  18. Nigel Drury,

    I may well look at using other brown inks as an alternative to Nut Brown.

    I have never added ink to PVA, but I have mixed acrylic paint with PVA when flocking bases and terrain, and that has certainly worked well enough to satisfy my personal requirements.

    All the best,

    Bob

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  19. More post necromancy. I like to do ink washes a la Les Bursley's recipes. Roughly, you use thinned matte medium as a base and add some drops of ink to get the color you want. If I remember I used about 20 drops to 10mL of thinned medium. I also go one step further when I'm washing and mix my base Raw Umber : Burnt Umber : Black washes in a 4:2:1 ratio, which I call "Grunge Wash". I like the look of it.

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  20. Sean,

    Thanks for the tip and the formula for your wash. I may well experiment with it when I paint some more figures.

    All the best,

    Bob

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