Thursday, 11 October 2012

Friegur: The 1930s German version of War-Chess?

As a result of my recent blog entry about WAR-CHESS I had a comment from Brian Carrick that this appeared to be a forerunner of a German wargame that was published in 1934 and called FRIEGUR.

Since then Nigel and Ian Drury (both long-term members of Wargame Developments) have been in contact about a copy of FRIEGUR that came onto the auction market some time ago. Apparently is was expected that it would reach a price of anything up to 4,000 Euros (!), but having seen the condition of the game in the copy of the catalogue that Ian Drury emailed to me, I can see why!



It would seem to me that it would not be very difficult to reproduce the board or playing pieces ... and had I the time, I might be tempted to do so ... but as later blog entries will indicate, I have something else I am trying to do at present.

6 comments:

  1. Nice find.

    One wonders if the black pieces are allowed to beat up the red pieces while they are still in the box.

    Of course in the yet to be discovered Russian version, the red pieces would be sending some of the black pawns off for "re-education".

    ;)

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  2. Pat G,

    Very amusing ... and I wonder if the choice of colours was deliberate or just made by chance?

    All the best,

    Bob

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  3. Looks like your Portable Wargame! Just not as good.

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  4. Phil Broeders,

    They do have some similarities ... but I hope that PW is just a little more aesthetically pleasing to look at.

    All the best,

    Bob

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  5. Fascinating looking game set - and the condition of the box, pieces and board is amazing considering its age. Definitely a collectors' item. I wonder how the game played?
    Cheers,
    Ion

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  6. Archduke Piccolo (Ion),

    For something that is nearly 80 years old it was in remarkiably good condition.

    As to how it played ... well if WAR-CHESS is anything to go by, the rules must have been quite simple. The complexity would have come from the different tactics employed by each player.

    All the best,

    Bob

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