Sunday, 8 December 2013

A very important clipping!

In amongst the clippings I was recently looking through I found the first ever wargames article I had published. I submitted it to Donald Featherstone and he kindly published it in the WARGAMERS' NEWSLETTER in the mid 1970s.


To read this article, please click on the images.
Bearing in mind that a lot of what I write today is about my solo wargames and the interwar era, it is not surprising that the article was about fighting a solo wargame set during the Sino-Japanese War.

Things have not changed very much in nearly forty years, have they?

16 comments:

  1. Thanks - it's now added to my collection of clipping :)

    Cheers,

    Pete.

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  2. Pete,

    Thanks for the compliment of even bothering to reading it, let alone adding it to your collection of clippings!

    All the best,

    Bob

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  3. Actually, it was quite an enjoyable read, and an interesting scenario without tanks or other armour. How were the companies constituted, by the way?

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  4. Archduke Piccolo,

    I must admit that it wasn't a bad first attempt ... and I am pleased that you enjoyed reading it.

    From what I can remember the companies were ten figures strong, with three man crews for the heavy weapons.

    All the best,

    Bob

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  5. Very enjoyable read. Could have been written yesterday. I think I will try out the scenario as a WWII game. Thanks Bob.

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  6. Meant to ask Bob- do you still have the converted figures?

    Maybe it's time for a refight?

    Cheers,

    Pete.

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  7. You know: I think this might be just the sort of thing for my Jono's World project...

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  8. That was an excellent entry into the wargaming public eye. It is interesting to reflect on the difference then and now, submitting an article or enquiry by mail and then the lengthy wait vs emails, blogs, etc and almost instant response .

    Is the Sanders you mention the Ed Sanders that occassionally mystifies the OSW group ? Did you know him or just pick up some ideas from an article perhaps ?

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  9. An August entry indeed! I can definitely spot the similarities in your prose over the years. Well done.

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  10. Alan Charlesworth,

    I am glad that you enjoyed reading this clipping ... and I would be interested to hear how the scenario plays out for you.

    All the best,

    Bob

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  11. Pete,

    I am afraid to say that most of the figures are long gone ... and those that remain are probably in my shed!

    As to a possible re-fight ... well anything is possible!

    All the best,

    Bob

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  12. Archduke Piccolo,

    I am sure that the scenario would fit in well with that project, as it would with the latest version of FUNNY LITTLE WARS.

    All the best,

    Bob

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  13. Ross Mac,

    I only have vague recollections of writing the article, and think that it was printed about six months after I sent it to Donald Featherstone for possible publication. Nowadays it could have been weeks rather than months between submission and publication.

    The Sandars that I was referring to in the article was John Sandars, who wrote AN INTRODUCTION TO WARGAMING. His book had been published in 1975, but he had written quite a few articles that had been published before that. He is one of the less well-known but nonetheless influential early wargamers. His area of expertise was World War II, and his model vehicle conversions were often featured in various wargame and modelling magazines.

    All the best,

    Bob

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  14. Conrad Kinch,

    I suspect that my writing style was heavily influenced by the compulsory study of Latin when I was at school! I learned to use the Passive tense a lot in my writing (as did the Romans) ... and it seems to have stuck!

    All the best,

    Bob

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  15. Thanks. I have him placed now, I remember some of those Airfix conversion articles and had his 7th Armoured book, not that I made the connection back then, authors were like mythological creatures from another dimension back then.

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  16. Ross Mac,

    He was quite prolific during his day (he was a retired naval officer) but I think that he died at quite a relatively young age. I first came across him on the pages of John Tunstill's MINIATURE WARFARE magazine, where his battle reports were always worth reading.

    All the best,

    Bob

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