Tuesday, 27 December 2016

How to ... construct a boxed version of the Portable Wargame

Recently I wanted to take a very fast-play version of my PORTABLE WARGAME on a cruise ... but space and weight considerations meant that I could not take any figures and terrain with me. I therefore set about constructing a boxed version of my game ... and this is how I did it.

Materials and Tools required
  • Several large (A4-size) self-adhesive laser/inkjet printer labels (J8167/L7167)
  • A colour laser or inkjet printer
  • A copy of the following warboard, unit, and terrain feature templates (These are available in PDF format here and here.)

  • An A4-size piece of foamcore
  • An A4-size piece of self-adhesive steel paper
  • An A5-size pieces of self-adhesive steel paper
  • At least one A5-size piece of self-adhesive magnetic sheet
  • Two A5-size pieces of mounting board or similar thick card
  • A sharp modelling knife, steel ruler, and cutting board (N.B. These should be used using the correct and safe methods, and modellers should always exercise care when using them.)
  • An A4-size Tiger Brand Slim Tuff Box, several D6 dice, and a copy of the rules

Construction Method
  • Print a copy of each of the templates onto an A4-size laser/inkjet printer labels
  • The Warboard
    1. Very carefully fix the label with printed warboard to the non-adhesive side of the A4-size sheet of self-adhesive steel paper.
    2. Very carefully fix this to the sheet of foamcore.
    3. Once this is complete, very carefully trim the whole assembly down so that it is neat and tidy. It is advisable to leave at least a 1cm wide space around three sides of the assembly and a large space along the fourth side. The latter is very useful for storing playing pieces etc. whilst a battle is being fought.
  • The Terrain Features
    1. Cut the label with the printed units and terrain features into two pieces so that the units are on one part and the terrain features are on the other.
    2. Very carefully fix the label with printed terrain features printed on it to the non-adhesive side of the A5-size sheets of self-adhesive steel paper.
    3. Very carefully fix this to one of the A5-size pieces of mounting board or similar thick card.
    4. Very carefully fix this to the adhesive side of an A5-size piece of self-adhesive magnetic sheet.
    5. Very carefully cut out the terrain features using the lines as a guide. Too much care cannot be exercised in doing this as the combined steel paper, mounting board/thick cardboard, and magnetic sheet are quite substantial.
    • (Note: The terrain features have magnetic bottoms to hold them in place on the warboard and steel paper under the printed top layer so that units will stay in place if place on them during a battle.)
  • The Units
    1. Very carefully fix the label with units printed on it to one of the A5-size pieces of mounting board or similar thick card.
    2. Very carefully fix this to the adhesive side of an A5-size piece of self-adhesive magnetic sheet.
    3. Very carefully cut out the units using the lines as a guide. Too much care cannot be exercised in doing this as the combined mounting board/thick cardboard and magnetic sheet are quite substantial.
The playing pieces are now complete, and can be stored – along with a copy of the rules and several D6 dice – in the Slim Tuff Box.

14 comments:

  1. That is an excellent idea, Robert. On my next cruise, I will pack up a small hex and counter game to take along with me. I will not be as original as you. My game will be a small board game from Vae Victis.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Jonathan Freitag,

      Cheers! I suspect that this idea could easily be adapted to a enable a lot of different types of wargames to be taken on holiday etc.

      All the best,

      Bob

      Delete
  2. Could you use printed paper troops for this? Cut them and fold them when you are ready to use them.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Nobby,

      Printed paper troops would be ideal for such a game ... and I would have used something like that if I had had time to make them before I went on my recent cruise.

      All the best,

      Bob

      Delete
  3. Last camping trip I went on I took a portable war-game with me. It fit in a box 3.1/2 X 5 1/2 X 1 inch. I brought 2- 2mm armies and terrain and a hex "game board" printed on a sheet of paper,along with dice. As I have memorized your "Memoir of Battle" rules, I didn't have printed rules. Unfortunately, I didn't get to use it. I will in all probability bring it with me on future trips.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Jhnptrqn,

      I'm glad that you came up with something similar, even if you didn't get a chance to use it. Perhaps the opportunity will arise on your next trip.

      All the best,

      Bob

      Delete
  4. Thank you for posting these instructions! I want to put one together.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Just the thing for trips when the hands start trembling because it has been a while...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Archduke Piccolo,

      Exactly ... and because it is so small, it will fit into a briefcase or even a large lunch box so that you can get a wargaming 'fix' almost anywhere!

      All the best,

      Bob

      Delete
  6. You forgot the river again!! why not use standard military symbols for the pieces? Another thought is Dry erase magnetic board and draw the terrain on with colored markers. Love the idea!
    Dick Bryant

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Dick Bryant,

      I have some ideas as to how to represent rivers, and may well use them on my next prototype ... if I ever build one.

      I did think about using standard military symbols for units on the playing pieces and also gave consideration to the possibility of unsing 'top down' views of figures and vehicles as an alternative. In the end lack of time meant that I had to make the playing pieces as simple as possible.

      I had not considered using a magnetic white board for my playing surface, but it makes perfect sense to do so. That is something else for me to think about with regard to any second prototype that I might build.

      All the best,

      Bob

      Delete
  7. What a great idea! Now you have set me thinking....
    A (clean) cardboard pizza box - about 12" square, 1" foamcore board squares......

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ian Dury,

      An unused pizza box would be an ideal starting point ... but then you wouldn't have had the enjoyment of eating the pizza as well as playing the game!

      All the best,

      Bob

      Delete