Wednesday, 24 May 2017

Warship 2017

The latest copy of WARSHIP was delivered last Friday. This is Volume XXXIX of this annual publication, and it is edited by John Jordan and published by Conway (ISBN 978 1 8944 6472 0).


This year's edition of the annual includes:
  • Editorial by John Jordan
  • The Japanese Battleships Kawachi and Settsu by Kathrin Milanovich
  • The British Armour Plate Pool Agreement of 1903 by David Boursnell
  • From Eritrea to Courbet by John Jordan
  • DDL: The Australian Light Destroyer Project of the early 1970s by Mark Briggs
  • From Elba to Europa by Michele Cosentino
  • Modern Mine Countermeasures by Conrad Waters
  • The Light Aircraft Carrier Ibuki Class by Hans Lengerer
  • HACS: Debacle or Just In Time? by Peter Marland
  • HMS Surrey: Britain's Last Treaty Cruiser by David Murfin
  • After the Kaiser: The Imperial German Navy's Light Cruisers after 1918 by Aidan Dodson
  • The US Navy's Last Monitors by A D Baker III
  • Warship Notes
  • Naval Books of the Year
  • Warship Gallery
Yet again this year's annual is full of interesting really articles, and I look forward to reading them over the next few days and weeks. In particular I want to spend some time reading Aidan Dodson's After the Kaiser: The Imperial German Navy's Light Cruisers after 1918. It is often forgotten that quite a few of the Light Cruisers that Germany built before and during the First World War were still in service – albeit in secondary roles – during the Second World War. For example, the former SMS Niobe became the Croatian Navy cruiser and training ship Dalmacija after serving in Yugoslav Navy as Dalmacija, then the Royal Italian Navy as Cattaro (she was seized after the invasion of Yugoslavia), then in the Kriegsmarine as Niobe for a second time, before being handed over to the Croatians! ...


... and SMS Ancona ended its life as a Flak Ship with Naval Flak Group 233 in and around Wilhelmshaven.

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