Friday, 16 March 2012

A busy day ... but I still had time for a bit of retail therapy!

This morning my wife and I went over to see my father in his care home. Unfortunately he was not having a good day, and although he recognised us, it took him some time to remember our names ... and that was only after considerable prompting.

The problem with his dementia is that it is not a gradual decline; it seems to stabilise for a while and then take a significant nose-dive, usually as a result of a chest or urinary infection. Sometimes there is a degree of 'recovery' after the infection has been dealt with, but each time his level of recent memory has been reduced. The prognosis is that this will continue.

We both felt rather 'down' after our visit, and my wife decided that a spot of lunch, followed by some retail therapy, might be in order to lift our spirits. She was right. Before having a very nice lunch of fish and chips in a local fish restaurant we spent some time wandering around the local shopping centre ... and for once I actually bought some things that I had been hoping to buy but which I expected would be out of stock.

The first thing that I bought was a Revell 1:1200th-scale model of the USS Yorktown.


This has been added to the growing pile of 1:1200th-scale model ships that I hope to build in the near future.

The other thing that I bought was a small modeller's hand drill.


This will hopefully enable me to drill holes in basswood a bit quicker that I can at the moment using my pin vices ... and with a bit of luck it will get some use over the next few days.

8 comments:

  1. Hi Bob,

    Sorry to hear about your Father and cannot imagine how distressing that must be for you both.

    At least the retail therapy and what sounded like a very nice lunch served as a respite.

    I sense a cunning plan with all this stockpiled plastic 1/1200th kit and am looking forward to seeing what springs out of the hat in due course.

    Following on from TGs naval review (actually larger than Spithead)I suspect you may have to go some to catch up!

    All the best,

    DC

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  2. David Crook,

    We knew things would get bad ... but knowing does not really prepare you for how bad it can be at times.

    I have quite a pile of 1:1200th-scale models to build ... and have not yet looked in my shed where I think that there might be even more (including several Triang Minic models).

    When they are all built my collection will rival Tim Gow's ... and may actually end up being bigger.

    All the best,

    Bob

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  3. It can be a rough ride at times Bob. My mom remembers that she has kids but they don't have grey hair in her mind.

    Interesting looking drill. I like my dremel for drilling, when I can get it to not wobble.

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  4. Hi Bob

    Sorry about your dad; it's no fun.

    Following your cartoon navy saga with interest. The drill looks interesting: I have a re-chargeable portable one made in Germany. Absolutely first class kit.

    But what with the business and business school I don't have time for anything else right now.

    End of this year....

    Regards

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  5. Ross Mac,

    What I find difficult to cope with is the fact that on some days my father is very lucid, and on others he is almost incoherent and rambling.

    I have a small electric drill that is rather like a Dremel and I also find that the torque can cause problems when I am trying to drill holes with any degree of accuracy. I could buy a small drill stand – for £50.00 or so – but it would not get enough usage to justify the expense.

    All the best,

    Bob

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  6. Arthur,

    Thanks for your supportive remark. As you say, it is no fun trying to deal with someone who has dementia.

    The 'cartoon' models are a happy medium for me between having an accurate scale model on the table top and representational model. Perhaps you might try building one or two yourself later this year if time allows. I must admit that I have found the process very therapeutic and relaxing.

    All the best,

    Bob

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  7. Sorry to hear about your Dad, we had the same experience with my Mum's dementia, her condition would stabilise but then after any infecton a bit more of her would be lost, it's a very harrowing time for you and I offer you my very best wishes. Brian

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  8. Brain Carrick,

    Thanks for you very understanding comment. It is difficult to describe quite how useless one feels in these sorts of situations. You have to see it for yourself before you can gain any true understanding, don't you?

    All the best,

    Bob

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