Sunday, 9 January 2011

Three Stations

This weekend has been rather hectic as I have had to drive over to East London to see my father in his residential care home and then on to Herne Bay in Kent to see my father-in-law. This, coupled with the need to do quite a lot of pre-Ofsted inspection work, has left me with little time for myself.

I did, however, manage a short time in the local bookshop, where I bought a copy of Martin Cruz Smith's latest Arkardy Renko novel, THREE STATIONS (Pan Macmillan [2010] ISBN 978 1 4050 9050 6).

I have read all the previous Renko novels (GORKY PARK, POLAR STAR, RED SQUARE, HAVANA BAY, WOLVES EAT DOGS, and STALIN'S GHOST) as well as Martin Cruz Smith's alternative history about the American West, THE INDIANS WON.

Buying this book made me realise that I do tend to read quite a few crime stories set in pre-Soviet, Soviet, and post-Soviet Russia. The list includes all the Erast Fandorin and Sister Pelagia novels by Boris Akunin as well as CHILD 44 and THE SECRET SPEECH by Tom Rob Smith.

I wonder why?

6 comments:

  1. Thanks for drawing this to my attention. I'm an Arkady Renko fan as well. I'l have to look out for it.

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  2. I'm just musing here. . . But perhaps it is because the various "commisars" in those novels remind you of certain people in the school hierarchy?


    -- Jeff

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  3. Hi Bob,

    In my experience it is sometimes best just to accept the inevitable and pursue your own avenue of literary enjoyment rather than questioning why!

    Because it is there perhaps?

    All the best,

    DC

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  4. Trebian,

    Be warned; I have already read the first five chapters, and I am 'hooked'.

    All the best,

    Bob

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  5. Bluebear Jeff,

    Funny you should say that ... it was what I was thinking.

    Sort of 'All success is due to the inspired school leadership team; all failure is due to counter-educational elements'.

    All the best,

    Bob

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  6. David Crook,

    The problem is that it is not in my nature at accept things without questioning ... even if I do not always voice those questions.

    As it happens, all these authors seem to be able to convey the 'amosphere' of the environment in which their heroes operate; the environment they share just happens to be Russia.

    All the best,

    Bob

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