Thursday, 7 February 2013

Indulging myself

Today is one of those days when I have indulged myself. After a good night's sleep my wife and I went to Bluewater (the large shopping centre that is just over ten miles from our home) where I ate a very good cooked breakfast of fried eggs, Cumberland sausages, grilled rashers of bacon, mushrooms, and grilled tomatoes, accompanied by toasted brown bread and butter, all washed down with a large glass of apple juice.

After breakfast I paid a visit to the local branch of Waterstones, where I spent some time browsing the shelves in the Military History and Fiction sections. I did not manage to find anything to buy, so I made my way to WHSmiths via Modelzone.

On the way there I met and had a short chat with one of my old bosses, Peter Wells. I first worked for Peter in the mid-1980s, when I was a post-16 education co-ordinator and he was the headteacher of the largest school I dealt with. On the day in 1991 that I was told that I was to be made redundant as a result of the break-up of the ILEA (Inner London Education Authority), I happened to mention this to Peter ... and he offered me a job on the spot! I worked for him until he retired in 1997, and my time working for him was amongst the most enjoyable years I had during my entire forty-year teaching career. Peter was a true gentleman and an inspiring leader. He always let you use your initiative and backed the decisions made by his staff. He was always willing to give praise where it was due and to make sure that credit was assigned to those who had done a good job.

My wife and I returned home at lunchtime, and I spent the afternoon writing a set of late nineteenth century wargames rules. This project is a pure indulgence on my part. The rules are intended for my own personal use and they are intended to cover both land and naval combat. They are heavily based on my previous PORTABLE WARGAME: 19TH CENTURY and PORTABLE NAVAL WARGAME: PRE-DREADNOUGHT rules. A copy of these rules can be downloaded here.

With a bit of luck I should be able to try out these rules at some point over the next few days ... and when I do, I will certainly write a battle report.

8 comments:

  1. Hi Bob,

    I note the 1891 in the title - methinks that some action set in that historical year may well be on the cards....;-)

    Very interesting looking set.

    All the best,

    DC

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  2. David Crook,

    Well spotted!

    I have heard tell of trouble - yet again! - between Rusland and Fezia. It appears that the Fezians have been building a coastal defence fort that commands the passage between the mainland of Rusland and a small disputed island ... and that the Rusland government is considering taking military action.

    I will say no more for the present.

    All the best,

    Bob

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  3. Disputed!?

    The Fezvinas Islands rightfully and historically belong to Fezia despite the imperious occupation by the dastardly Ruslandish people!!!

    Biz Fezvinas fethedecektir!!!!

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  4. SAROE,

    I somehow think that the government of Rusland might dispute the Fezian 'claims' ... and may well feel inclined to use force to ensure that the Fezians realise the error of their ways.

    All the best,

    Bob

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  5. You went to all the places I visit in Bluewater before escaping except for her passion "Hotel Chocolat"......

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  6. Francis Lee,

    The whole world goes to Bluewater ... and I am told that if you stand in the same spot long enough, you will eventually meet everyone that you know.

    Judging by our shared interests (including chocolate!), I am surprised that we have not yet bumped into each other!

    Perhaps one day ...

    All the best,

    Bob

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  7. These look great Bob!

    I think the breaking out of gun and ship types is a bold move and will model what we are after very nicely.

    A match-up between an ACW tinclad gunboat and a dirt fort with a few 12 pounder Napoleons could be very interesting.

    I will give the rules a run tomorrow night with a match-up of Fort Powell vs. the US monitor Chickasaw.

    BTW, your outpouring of rules lately has got me in a quandary of what to play/playtest next! I've almost finished my roman flats for ancients, I've got another desert battle set up already, and these rules are just what I've been needing for ACW action.
    -Steve

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  8. Steven Page,

    The idea for have differentiated values for ships and guns came from my good old friend Jane's Naval War Game! It is what he did … so I just copied the idea from him.

    A slugging match between a tinclad gunboat and an improvised earthwork fort sound like it could be an interesting and fairly balanced contest … and I look forward to reading how it goes if you manage to stage a battle between the two.

    Sorry about giving you too many ideas for battles that you want to fight. I blame retirement and bad weather, both of which have given me too much time indoors thinking and writing!

    All the best,

    Bob

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