Wednesday, 18 April 2012

I have been to ... the walls and defences of Dubrovnik: A photo-essay

During my recent trip to the Adriatic I was able to walk around parts of the ancient walls and defences of Dubrovnik. The following photo-essay shows what I saw.

Map showing the walls, the major fortresses, and some of the main buildings of Dubrovnik.
The outer entrance of the Pile Gate. The dry moat outside the walls is crossed by a stone bridge and drawbridge, and this is protected by this half-tower.
The walls looking from the Pile Gate towards the Bokar Fortress. The dry moat is now used as a park and gardens.
Another view of the tower shown in the centre of the previous photograph.
The Bokar Fortress. It commands a small inlet at the western end of Dubrovnik.
Across the narrow gap that forms the inlet is an outwork known as St Lawrence Fortress.
One of the bastions that protect the wall between the Pile Gate and the Minčeta Fortress.
The tower of the Minčeta Fortress as seen from the dry moat just below the bridge to the outer part of the Pile Gate.
A more detailed photograph of the tower of the Minčeta Fortress.
The inner part of the Pile Gate. It is reached from the outer part by a set of stairs and a slope.
The Old Harbour of Dubrovnik as seen from the walls near the Ploče Gate.
St John's Fortress as seen from the walls near the Ploče Gate. 
Another view of the Old Harbour as seen from the walls near the Ploče Gate.
A more detailed photograph of the bastion shown on the previous photograph.
An old (and somewhat damaged) cannon on the walls near the Ploče Gate.  
Another view of the old cannon on the walls near the Ploče Gate.
The outer part of the Ploče Gate, looking westwards. Like the Pile Gate, there is a stone bridge and drawbridge.
The inner part of the Ploče gate. The tower of the Dominican Monastery can be seen in the background.
The tower of the Dominican Monastery can be seen rising above this photograph of the northern part of Dubrovnik's Old Harbour. This photograph was taken from St John's Fortress.
Another photograph of the northern part of the Old Harbour. The Revelin Fortress can just be seen behind the trees.
St John's Fortress as seen from the waterfront of the Old Harbour.
The Revelin Fortress. Although not part of the walls of Dubrovnik, it protects the approaches to the Ploče gate and the northern part of the Old Harbour.
A general view of the Old Harbour. The photograph was taken from the foot of St John's Fortress, and the towers of the Dominican Monastery, the Minčeta Fortress, and the Sponza Palace can clearly be seen.
The tower of the Minčeta Fortress as seen from St John's Fortress.
Another photograph of the Revelin Fortress showing the stone bridge and outer part of the Ploče Gate.
The eastern seaward side of St John's Fortress.
The south eastern seaward side of St John's Fortress and the walls that form the southern defences of Dubrovnik.
Some photographs of the cannons situated outside the Maritime Museum that is located in St. John's Fortress.




The towers of the Minčeta Fortress and Sponza Palace as seen from St John's Fortress.

12 comments:

  1. Hi Bob

    Great posts. No sooner have I finished one than another pops up! Keep 'em coming.

    I have prowled Budapest on 2 occasions and regret not recording my observations, but the history of Europe is marvelous, no?

    I am working on a thesis here, but the internet is open for these splendid diversions.

    Regards

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  2. Arthur,

    Keep watching! There will be at least one more long blog entry that deals with the ship models in the Venice Maritime Museum ... and that is going to be very image-heavy.

    I have yet to visit Budapest ... but I hope to one day.

    Good luck with you thesis.

    All the best,

    Bob

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  3. Jim Duncan,

    One day I hope to walk the walls. If I do I will certainly write a long blog entry about it.

    All the best,

    Bob

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  4. Bob

    I have it, you need a 10 day cruise down the Danube!

    Imagine, all those places...

    Tempting myself here, hmm.

    Regards

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  5. Very nice report and expose. Interesting how closely the guns resemble the painted plastic ones sold by Elastolin in the 60's.

    I'm embarrassed to say that I had to go look up Dubrovnik as other than guessing that it lay on what was for a short while, the Yugoslav cost, I couldn't exactly place it. The result was an enjoyable brief refresh of place in the history of Ragussa/Dubrovnik so thank you for stimulating that.

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  6. Arthur,

    Funnily enough it is such a cruise that my wife and I have recently discussed taking at sometime in the near future.

    All the best,

    Bob

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  7. Ross Mac,

    It was interesting to see the variety of different guns that were on display at various places around the city's walls. One got the impression that anything that could fire was used for the city's defence, regardless of its age!

    Dubrovnik is almost the last bit of southern coastal Croatia and lies very close to the border with Bosnia-Herzegovina. Its history is extremely interesting, and if you ever get a chance, I would recommend that you visit Dubrovnik.

    All the best,

    Bob

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  8. I visited Dubrovnik in 1989 and it was a truly fascinating place.

    I was then very sad to see, a few years later, the hotel that I had stayed in totally demolished from shelling during the Serb/ Croatian conflict and although I gather the old city did suffer some damage it escaped any major damage.
    I take it the war damage suffered by the modern parts of the city has been tidied up or is there still evidence of the troubles?

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  9. Kingsley Park,

    Dubrovnik is a lovely place to visit ... when it is not full of tourists!

    As far as I know, the damage to both the old and new parts of the city has been repaired, and many buildings that were badly damaged have been rebuilt.

    There are still marks on walls from shell and mortar splinters, and some buildings have boards outside that describe (and sometimes show) the damage the building suffered. Some even have personal accounts of what happened to the people inside the building when they came under fire ... and the sentiments expressed are very unequivocal with regard to those who were firing artillery and mortars at Dubrovnik during the siege.

    All the best,

    Bob

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  10. Geordie an Exiled FOG,

    The defences of Dubrovnik are the most impressive I have seen in the Adriatic ... but in there own way so are those around the old towns of Korcula and Kotor.

    All the best,

    Bob

    ReplyDelete