Pages

Friday, 20 May 2022

Back to the Belle Époque

Back in the early 1990s I painted a number of 15mm Pathan figures manufactured by Irregular Miniatures, I have used them on and off since then, and I have decided that I am going to renovate, varnish, and rebase them so that I can add them to my Belle Époque imagi-nations collection.

The working name for the imagi-nation whose army these figures will become is Khyberistan. The army will be made up of several tribal infantry regiments supported by two tribal artillery regiments. Each tribe has a different coloured turban (red, white, and cream) and each infantry and artillery regiment will have its own supply column.

Kyhberistan will be a mountainous country and will be ruled by an Emir who is based in its capital, Kalabar. (For those of you who haven’t realised yet, I am drawing heavily on CARRY ON UP THE KHYBER for my inspiration1)

Thursday, 19 May 2022

Two more books are now available in PDF format

I have added another two books in PDF format to the list that are currently available from Wargames Vault. They are:

A Winter-ish War

Trouble in Zubia

This pretty well concludes the process of migrating PDF editions of my wargame books over to Wargames Vault. I may add HEXBLITZ and LA ULTIMA CRUZADA at some point in the future, but I am unsure when that might be.

Tuesday, 17 May 2022

Three more book PDFs are now available

I have continued to add further titles to the list of book PDFs that are available to buy from Wargames Vault.

The books are:

The Portable Napoleonic Wargame

The Portable Colonial Wargame

The Madasahatta Campaign

The PDFs are US Letter size rather than A5 size, and as it previous books, the text and illustrations have been adjusted to to make the best of the increased page size. In the case of The Madasahatta Campaign, recently drawn coloured versions of the campaign maps have also been added to the text.

Sunday, 15 May 2022

Nugget 344

I collected the latest issue of THE NUGGET yesterday, and I will post it out to members tomorrow morning. In the meantime, members can read this issue online.

IMPORTANT: Please note that this is the eighth issue of THE NUGGET to be published for the 2021-2022 subscription year. If you have not yet re-subscribed, a reminder was sent to you some time ago. If you wish to re-subscribe using the PayPal option on the relevant page of the website, you can use the existing buttons as the subscription cost has not changed.

Saturday, 14 May 2022

More book PDFs are now available

Yesterday I managed to add three more titles to the list of book PDFs that are available to buy from Wargames Vault.

The books are:

The Portable Wargame

Developing the Portable Wargame

Gridded Naval Wargames

The PDFs are US Letter size rather than A5 size, and the text and illustrations have been adjusted to to make the best of the increased page size.

Friday, 13 May 2022

Testing time

I spent a large chunk of yesterday at University Hospital Lewisham having a bone scan. Sue came with me to keep me company … and to drive me home afterwards if I felt unwell afterwards. My appointment was for 9.30am, and thanks to the heavy traffic on the South Circular Road, it took us over an hour to drive the four miles from home to the hospital. Luckily, we had left enough time to allow for holdups, and I was in the Nuclear Medicine Department just before 9.30am.

I was intravenously injected with a small quantity of radioactive material … and then told to come back at midday for my scan. This was to allow time for the blood to circulate the radioactive material around my body, particularly my skeleton.

As Sue and I had not eaten breakfast before leaving home, we made our way to the hospital’s coffee shop, where we each had a bacon roll and a café latte. This took until just after 10.00am, and as the weather was quite pleasant, Sue and I went out of the hospital’s rear entrance, which led us into Ladywell Fields. This is a large open space that is bordered on one side by the main line railway from London to Hayes, Kent, and on the other by the River Ravensbourne. Besides areas of grass where people can walk their dogs and children can play ball games, there are a number of tennis courts, a children’s playground, an athletics track, and a small cafe.

Sue and I wandered around the park until 11.30am, at which point we returned to the hospital’s main entrance. As we still had about twenty minutes until I was due to have my scan, we went across the road to have a look at the local war memorial.

Next to the main memorial was a smaller memorial to those local men who won the Victoria Cross, and each of them was further commemorated by an individual paving slab.

I was back at the Nuclear Medicine Department by midday, and my scan took just under an hour. I then went out to the car park, where I had arranged to meet Sue. She had used the time I had been having my scan to have a walk around the local area, and after searching the graveyard of the nearby Church of St Mary the Virgin, she had discovered a short row of local shops. Amongst them was a proper bakery, and rather than go straight home, Sue suggested that we might go there to buy something for lunch. We did ... and each of us bought one of their home-made Cornish Pasties as well as a cake, which we took home to eat.

I expect to hear the results of my scan in about a week’s time. In the meantime, I am still undergoing hormone treatment that is supposed to stop the cancer growing any further.

Wednesday, 11 May 2022

Nugget 344

The editor of THE NUGGET sent me the latest issue last weekend, and I have sent it to the printer today. If they manage to print it as quickly as they usually do, it should be ready for collection by the end of this week, and I will then be able to post it out to members by the beginning of next week.

IMPORTANT: Please note that this is the eighth issue of THE NUGGET to be published for the 2021-2022 subscription year. If you have not yet re-subscribed, a reminder was sent to you some time ago. If you wish to re-subscribe using the PayPal option on the relevant page of the website, you can use the existing buttons as the subscription cost has not changed.

Tuesday, 10 May 2022

A short progress report

I have been working on converting the remaining PORTABLE WARGAME books into PDF format. I have changed the page size from A5 to US Letter size as this can be printed in A4 size as well, thus meeting the requirements of players across the world.

Doing this has given me the opportunity to make a few changes. These include increasing the size of some of the illustrations and correcting some of the grammatical errors and typos that I missed when the books were first published.

Sunday, 8 May 2022

I am currently working on converting more books into PDF format

Although both Sue and I seem to have come down with colds, we have been keeping ourselves busy. She has been sorting out her collection of dolls houses, and I have been working on converting more of my books into PDF format.

I am taking the opportunity to correct some of the more obvious mistakes as I go through the conversion process, and I am changing the size of the books so that they are going to be US Letter size rather than A5 size. This will make them easier to print out as there will be few pages and they can be printed out in A4 size without any difficulty ... or so I am informed!

I will make an announcement on my blog when the books are available in PDF format ... which I hope will be by the end of the week at the latest!

Friday, 6 May 2022

A game of vignettes? Using the Fast Play 3 x 3 Portable Wargame to fight larger battles

Some years ago, the late George Jeffries experimented with a system that he termed the Variable Length Bound. This is defined in the current edition of the Wargame Developments Handbook as follows:

Variable Length Bound

The technique to adjusting the time interval of a game to critical events e.g. If it is obvious that no contact will be made for a period of 12 hours, when the time in the game will be moved on by 12 hours and the tactical situation reassessed there, rather than repeat a standard 1 hour game turn 12 times in a row. A difficult concept to grasp and adopt, because it implies ignoring those units out of contact and moving the elements of a force direct to their critical events, despite the fact that some of these events occur at different times. Best used with a "standard" time slice, but with ways of incorporating multiple slices in a single turn.

Looking at this anew, it struck me that what he was trying to do was to fight wargames where there was an emphasis on the important or crucial events of a battle rather making players recreate its entirety ... including all the boring bits where very little happened!

It further struck me that the Fast Play 3 x 3 Portable Wargame (FP3x3PW) provided a potential way of doing the same thing, with each crucial event being fought out as a vignette within the battle using FP3x3PW.

I looked around for an example of how I could do this and decided upon the Battle of Waterloo. It splits nicely into the following vignettes:

  • The attack on Hougoumont
  • The Grand Battery opens fire
  • The first French infantry attack (including the attack on La Haie Sainte)
  • The charge of the British heavy cavalry
  • The French cavalry attack
  • The second French infantry attack (including the capture of La Haie Sainte)
  • The Prussian attack at Placenoit
  • The assault by the French Imperial Guard

Each of the above could quite easily be fought as separate FP3x3PW battles, thus giving players the ability to refight Waterloo without having to invest a lot of space, time, and money to do so.

I am sure that other battles (e.g. Gettysburg) could be refought in a similar fashion, and this is an idea that I might well look at in great depth over the coming months. It might even make for an interesting chapter in a SECOND PORTABLE WARGAME COMPENDIUM!

Thursday, 5 May 2022

Seventy-seven years ago today …

Seventy-seven years ago my father was in Wismar, Germany. He was serving with 53rd (Worcestershire Yeomanry) Air landing Light Regiment, Royal Artillery, which was part of 6th Airborne Division. They had arrived there on 2nd May 1945 … just ahead of the Russians. He was eighteen years old and had been called up on his birthday in 1944. He remained in the army after the war ended, serving in India and Burma before he was demobbed in 1947.

Thanks to my current medical problems, I’ve been thinking a lot about my parents over the past few weeks. Had they still been alive, my mother would have been ninety-four years old, and my father would have been ninety-five. In fact, he would have been ninety-six on 17th May.

Whatever my future holds, they gave me a great start in life. They both came from humble working-class areas of London (my mother came from Lambeth and my father cane from the East End), but they worked hard to give their children the best that they could. We were encouraged to be as successful as we could be in whatever fields our talents took us into. My brother and I went to the same secondary school (Palmers Endowed School for Boys, Grays, Essex) and both left with good qualifications that enabled us to choose the careers that we wanted to follow.

From my mother I inherited a creative streak (she was a very talented artist and worked for Warner Brothers as an airbrush artist) and from my father I inherited a love of mathematics, particularly geometry (he became a gunner because of his talent for trigonometry and geometry and became an accountant after leaving the army). Thanks to their nature and the nurture I received, I can look back on what I think was a successful career in education and forward to a career as a writer and wargame designer.

Tuesday, 3 May 2022

Making PDF editions of books available for sale online

I was surprised at both the speed with which Wargames Vault was able to make the PDF edition of THE PORTABLE WARGAME COMPENDIUM available online and the volume of sales it has enjoyed. As a result, I have now made PDF editions of the following books available via Wargames Vault:

The Balkan League

¡Arriba España!

The Portable Pike & Shot Wargame

Restless Natives

With the exception of RESTLESS NATIVES, which is priced at £2.50, the other books are £5.00 each.

As time permits, I may well add further PDF editions of my books to the list that is on sale at Wargame Vault.

Monday, 2 May 2022

Looking at the Portable Wargame grids

Whilst sitting in hospital on Friday waiting for my appointment with the Endoscopy Department, my mind turned to thinking about the standard 8 x 8 PORTABLE WARGAME square grid ...

... and its 3 x 3 FAST PLAY version ...

... when suddenly realised that it was quite possible to overlay one on the other if one was willing to compromise a little.

This is more obvious if I overlay a red version of the 3 x 3 square grid ...

...over a grey version of the 8 x 8 square grid ...

... thus:

I must admit that I am amazed that I hadn't noticed that this was possible before last Friday. As to the compromise ... well the size of the Reserve Areas and Flanks are reduced in comparison with the size of the 3 x 3 grid squares, but as a lot of players seem to favour larger grid squares for their 3 x 3 battles, this seems to me to be a minor compromise.

PS. The need to compromise on the size of the Reserve Areas and Flanks disappears completely if one uses a 10 x 10 square grid for one's 'standard' PORTABLE WARGAMES, thus:

Friday, 29 April 2022

The Portable Wargame Compendium is now available in PDF format!

Wargames Vault have pulled out all the stops and have made THE PORTABLE WARGAME COMPENDIUM available online in watermarked PDF format.

It is on sale for the same price as the Kindle edition (£5.00 or its equivalent in local currency) and can be found here.

If this proves to be a success, I may well publish some of my other books in the same format with Wargames Vault.

Thursday, 28 April 2022

Soldiers of the Queen (SOTQ): Issue 183

The Spring 2022 issue of the Victorian Military Society's SOTQ (Soldiers of the Queen) arrived in the post yesterday, and as I have come to expect, it contains a very interesting selection of articles on a wide variety of subjects.

The articles included in this issue are:

  • One Book and Many Films: 'The Four Feathers' by Dr Rodney Atwood
  • 'Comrades ... stick together!' The Life Guards' mutiny of 1892 by Dr Andrew Windrow
  • 'Soldiers of the Queen' in the Great War by John Sly
  • Fatal accidents and misadventures that occurred during the War with Russia, 1854-1856 by r Mike Hinton
  • Obituary: Captain Howard S. Brown
  • Book Reviews by Dr Roger T Stearn
  • Officers of the Victorian Military Society

As 'The Four Feathers' is one of my favourite films (I own three versions on DVD!), the article by Dr Roger Atwood was by far and away my favourite one in this issue, but the article about the Life Guards' mutiny was a topic that I had never heard or read about before, and it certain ly piqued my interest.

The cost of membership of the Victorian Military Society (UK: £25.00 and Overseas: £30.00) is well worth it.

Wednesday, 27 April 2022

A review of my Belle Époque imagi-nation Armed Forces

In response to several requests, here are some photographs of the four sets of imagi-nation Armed Forces in my collection.


The Armed Forces of Burgundy


The Armed Forces of Khakistan


The Armed Forces of Schwarzenberg


The Armed Forces of Stalbania

Monday, 25 April 2022

The Portable Wargame Compendium has been published!

Amazon was very fast off the mark when I approved THE PORTABLE WARGAME COMPENDIUM for publication, and the printed paperback edition is now available to buy online. Furthermore, the Kindle edition is available for pre-order for publication on 28th April.

The hardback edition will be available to purchase once they have been printed in Europe and shipped to various Amazon warehouses.

I am still trying to find a way to make a PDF edition available. One avenue that I am exploring is distributing it myself. If I do, I will ask buyers to contact me on a dedicated email address, and then bill them using a PayPal invoice. Once that is paid, I will email a copy of the PDF to the purchaser.

Sunday, 24 April 2022

The Armed Forces of my Belle Époque imagi-nations

Having completed the model ironclad battleships for my Belle Époque imagi-nations, I thought that a review of the collection I have been building up was due.


THE ARMED FORCES OF BURGUNDY

Navy

The Burgundian Navy currently comprises the following ships:

  • Battleships
    • République
    • Liberté

Army

The Burgundian Army currently comprises the following units:

  • Infantry
    • 1st Infantry Regiment
      • 1/1st Infantry Battalion
      • 2/1st Infantry battalion
    • 2nd Infantry Regiment
      • 1/2nd Infantry Battalion
      • 2/2nd Infantry Battalion
    • 3rd Infantry Regiment
      • 1/3rd Infantry Battalion
      • 2/3rd Infantry Battalion
    • 4th Infantry Regiment
      • 1/4th Infantry Battalion
      • 2/4th Infantry Battalion
    • 5th Infantry Regiment
      • 1/5th Infantry Battalion
      • 2.5th Infantry Battalion
    • 11th Infantry Regiment
      • 1/11th Infantry Battalion
      • 2/11th Infantry Battalion
    • 12th Infantry Regiment
      • 1/12th Infantry Battalion
      • 2/12th Infantry Battalion
    • 13th Infantry Regiment
      • 1/13th Infantry Battalion
      • 2/13th Infantry Battalion
    • 21st Infantry Regiment
      • 1/21st Infantry Battalion
      • 2/21st Infantry Battalion
    • 22nd Infantry Regiment
      • 1/22nd Infantry Battalion
      • 2/22nd Infantry Battalion
    • 23rd Infantry Regiment
      • 1/23rd Infantry Battalion
      • 2/23rd Infantry Battalion
    • 1st Machine Gun Battalion
    • 2nd Machine Gun Battalion
    • 3rd Machine Gun Battalion
  • Cavalry
    • 1st Cavalry Regiment
      • 1/1st Cavalry Squadron
      • 2/1st Cavalry Squadron
    • 2nd Cavalry Regiment
      • 1/2nd Cavalry Squadron
      • 2/2nd Cavalry Squadron
  • Artillery
    • 1st Field Artillery Regiment
    • 2nd Field Artillery Regiment
    • 3rd Field Artillery Regiment
  • Engineers
    • 1st Engineer Battalion
    • 2nd Engineer Battalion
    • 3rd Engineer Battalion
  • Train
    • 1st Supply Column
    • 2nd Supply Column
    • 3rd Supply Column
    • 4th Supply Column
  • Generals
    • A General (Mounted)
    • Three Major-General (Mounted)
    • Two Brigadier-Generals (Foot)

Units shown in italics are reserve units.


THE ARMED FORCES OF KHAKISTAN

Navy

The Khakistani Navy currently comprises the following ship:

  • Battleship
    • Zafer

Army

The Khakistani Army currently comprises the following units:

  • Infantry
    • 1st Infantry Regiment
      • 1/1st Infantry Battalion
      • 2/1st Infantry Battalion
    • 2nd Infantry Regiment
      • 1/2nd Infantry Battalion
      • 2/2nd Infantry Battalion
    • 3rd Infantry Regiment
      • 1/3rd Infantry Battalion
      • 2/3rd Infantry Battalion
    • 11th Infantry Regiment
      • 1/11th Infantry Battalion
      • 2/11th Infantry Battalion
    • 12th Infantry Regiment
      • 1/12th Infantry Battalion
      • 2/12th Infantry Battalion
    • 1st Machine Gun Battalion
  • Cavalry
    • 1st Light Cavalry Regiment
      • 1/1st Light Cavalry Squadron
      • 2/1st Light Cavalry Squadron
    • 2nd Lancer Regiment
      • 1/2nd Lancer Squadron
      • 2/2nd Lancer Squadron
  • Artillery
    • 1st Field Artillery Regiment
    • 2nd Field Artillery Regiment
  • Engineers
    • 1st Engineer Battalion
  • Train
    • 1st Supply Column
    • 2nd Supply Column
  • Generals
    • A Major-General (Mounted)
    • Two Brigadier-Generals (Foot)

Units shown in italics are reserve units.


THE ARMED FORCES OF SCHWARZENBERG

Navy

The Schwarzenberg Navy currently comprises the following ships:

  • Battleships
    • Kaiser Frederick
    • Kaiserin Augusta

Army

The Schwarzenberg Army currently comprises the following units:

  • Infantry
    • 1st Infantry Regiment
      • 1/1st Infantry Battalion
      • 2/1st Infantry Battalion
    • 2nd Infantry Regiment
      • 1/2nd Infantry Battalion
      • 2/2nd Infantry Battalion
    • 3rd Infantry Regiment
      • 1/3rd Infantry Battalion
      • 2/3rd Infantry Battalion
    • 4th Infantry Regiment
      • 1/4th Infantry Battalion
      • 2/4th Infantry Battalion
    • 5th Infantry Regiment
      • 1/5th Infantry Battalion
      • 2/5th Infantry Battalion
    • 6th Infantry Regiment
      • 1/6th Infantry Battalion
      • 2/6th Infantry Battalion
    • 11th Infantry Regiment
      • 1/11th Infantry Battalion
      • 2/11th Infantry Battalion
    • 12th Infantry Regiment
      • 1/12th Infantry Battalion
      • 2/12th Infantry Battalion
    • 1st Machine Gun Battalion
    • 2nd Machine Gun Battalion
  • Cavalry
    • 1st Hussar Regiment
      • 1/1st Hussar Squadron
      • 2/1st Hussar Squadron
    • 2nd Hussar Regiment
      • 1/2nd Hussar Squadron
      • 2/2nd Hussar Squadron
  • Artillery
    • 1st Field Artillery Regiment
    • 2nd Field Artillery Regiment
    • 3rd Field Artillery Regiment
  • Engineers
    • 1st Engineer Battalion
    • 2nd Engineer Battalion
  • Train
    • 1st Supply Column
    • 2nd Supply Column
    • 11th Supply Column
    • 12th Supply Column
  • Generals
    • Three Major-Generals (Mounted)
    • Two Brigadier-Generals (Foot)

Units shown in italics are reserve units.


THE ARMED FORCES OF STALBANIA

Army

The Stalbanian Army currently comprises the following units:

  • Infantry
    • 1st Infantry Regiment
      • 1/1st Infantry Battalion
      • 2/1st Infantry Battalion
    • 1st Machine Gun Battalion
  • Artillery
    • 1st Field Artillery Regiment
  • Engineers
    • 1st Engineer Battalion
  • Train
    • 1st Supply Column
  • Generals
    • A General (Foot)

Saturday, 23 April 2022

Funny Little Wars

Some time ago, I (and several other people) helped to encourage Paul Wright to produce a new, revised edition of his FUNNY LITTLE WARS book. He has, and it is now on sale from Lulu.com for £20.00.

The book is substantially different from the first edition and reflects the developments and changes the rules have undergone in the intervening years. The book comes in two parts, the first explaining the background to the rules, the way the rules work, a couple of scenarios, and suggestion on how to build a suitable toy soldier army and to conduct a garden wargame. The second part contains useful information and a brief summary of the rules.

The contents include:

  • Introduction
  • 01. The History of Mr. Wells
  • 02. Playing Little Wars Yesterday
  • 03. Playing Little Wars Today
  • 04. The Basic Rules
  • 05. The Advance Rules
  • 06. Some Sound Advice for Such Men
  • 07.Two Classic Scenarios from Little Wars
  • 08. The Historical Setting of Little Wars
  • 09. Building an Army
  • 10. The Garden or Arranging the Country
  • 11. The Idle Hills of Summer, and a Last Word
  • Funny Little Wars Kitbag
    • I. Toy Soldier Resources
    • II. Further Reading
    • III. Army Lists
    • IV. Players Aide Memoire
    • V. Playing Aids

The Army Lists include ones for:

  • Army Red (AKA Britain)
  • Army Blue (AKA France)
  • Army Black (AKA Germany)
  • Army Black, Yellow, Red (AKA Belgium)
  • Armies Orange/Green (AKA The Irish Republican and Protestant Volunteers)
  • Army Dark Green (or the Tumbling Bear) (AKA Russia)
  • Army Cerise (or the Rising Sun) (AKA Japan)
  • Army Orange (AKA The Boer Republics)

The book contains numerous colour illustrations, both old and new. and in my opinion is even better than the first edition.

The book opens with a very interesting statement which sets the stage for the rest of the book:

This is a work of the imagination.

Picture a garden, with HG Wells and toy soldiers ...

...the idea of a Late Edwardian afternoon, and a little campaign in the sunshine set in the far away world of hills, forests, castles and forts.

This is a game of imagination ...

'I dream, therefore I exist'

August Strinberg


FUNNY LITTLE WARS: EDWARDIAN GARDEN WARGAMES IN THE STYLE OF MR HG WELLS was written by Paul Holcroft Wright and published in 2022 by Battlefield History Litd. (ISBN 978 1 4583 7005 1).

Friday, 22 April 2022

The Khakistani ironclad battleship

It took me less time than I expected to build my model of the Khakistani ironclad battleship and to paint it.

The colour scheme I chose was similar to that on the other ships I had modelled, and featured a black hull, beige upperworks, and an ochre funnel.

Thursday, 21 April 2022

The Portable Wargame Compendium ... is being proof printed!

Yesterday I finally drew a line under any further work on the forthcoming PORTABLE WARGAME COMPENDIUM and uploaded the text to Amazon's Kindle Direct Publishing (KDP). There were a few minor problems that needed to be solved, but these just took a bit of time and some effort on my part to sort out. Once that was done, I saved the book in draft form and ordered some printed proof copies. These should be with me by the middle of next week, and once I have checked them, I will release the book for publication.

The cover of the paperback edition looks like this:

They will be printed in colour and the final price will be about £20 for the hardback and £14 for the paperback. I’m still looking at how to make the book available in PDF format as KDP does not support the sale of books in that format.

Wednesday, 20 April 2022

The trials and tribulations continue

At 9.00am on Tuesday I was phoned by one of the nurses from the Urology Department at the Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Woolwich. They asked me to go for a short consultation at 11.00am and to collect a prescription for the first stage of my treatment. Sue and I drove to the hospital, and by 11.00am we were sitting in the reception area for the Urology Outpatients Clinic, waiting for my appointment. The nurse was running a little late, but by 11.45am I had been seen, and we then set of to the hospital pharmacy to collect my prescription.

That is where things began to go a bit awry.

On reaching the pharmacy, I had to join a queue to hand my prescription in. This took fifteen minutes ... but when I got to the front of the queue, I was told that the prescribing doctor had not written their name in the correct box on the prescription form and that I had to go back to the Urology clinic to get this error corrected!

I did as requested ... and then had to re-join the queue to hand my now correctly completed prescription in. I then had to wait for a further forty-five minutes for the pharmacist to complete my prescription. During this hiatus, Sue went off to find somewhere outside to sit.

By the time I left the hospital and re-joined Sue, it was after 1.00pm. On the way back to our car I tried to pay for our parking, only to discover that the single coin payment machine in the whole car park was full and would not process any further payments. I then tried to pay online ... but as I did not have the parking company's app on my telephone and I hadn't got my credit card with me, I could not pay! I now risk a £80.00 'fine' for non-payment, so I took a photo of the machine showing the fact that I had tried to pay but was unable to do so.

The icing on this particular day's cake came later in the day when I went to my GP's surgery to hand in the paperwork the hospital had given me for my doctor so that I could arrange an appointment to have an injection that will form part of my treatment. (I have to take a course of tablets for four weeks, and halfway through I have to have an injection of another drug that will work with the tablets.)

When I spoke to the receptionist at the GP surgery, they told me that they were not able to arrange an appointment unless they had the drug ... but they were not sure if they had to give me the prescription for the drug so that I can get from the pharmacy and take it to them or if they could order it directly.

The receptionist consulted the practice manager, who then had to discuss the situation with the person in charge of processing prescriptions. They eventually came up with a solution; the GP surgery will order the drug directly and then contact me to arrange a date and time for my appointment.

The thing that I found disturbing was the fact that they had no idea how long it would take for the dug to be delivered. I kept repeating that for the drug to be effective, I needed to have the injection on Wednesday 3rd May. The practice manager assured me that she didn't expect there would be a problem ... but I was not convinced when I left the surgery and won't be until they confirm my appointment.

Tuesday, 19 April 2022

My Khakistani ironclad battleship

Khakistan is an imagi-nation that draws its inspiration from Ottoman Turkey, and when thinking about a design for an ironclad battleship for the Khakistani Navy, I looked at the various warships that served in the Ottoman Navy during the 1880s and 1890s. After considering the options, I chose to base my design on that of the Osmaniye-class.

These ships were constructed in the 1860s as broadside ironclads, ...

... but they were modernised and reconstructed in the early 1890s. They were re-boilered, re-engined, and rearmed with two 9.4-inch/24cm guns mounted in single centreline barbettes fore and aft of the ship’s main superstructure.

The modernised ships looked like this …

… and when ‘cartoonised’, the design looked like this.