Monday, 13 February 2012

A mercantile interlude ... is over

I finally managed to finish painting the merchant ships that will be taking part in a forthcoming Fletcher Pratt Naval War Game.


In the end I did not add any detail to the models as they will need to be fairly robust to survive the rigours of a wargame that will be fought out on the floor. The models were made from basswood and I found that they needed four coats of paint before the surface was smooth enough to pass muster, but now that they are finished I think that they look good enough for their intended purpose.

14 comments:

  1. Cheap and cheerful! Perhaps another candidate for your 'how to' downloads?

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  2. Tim Gow,

    These were so simple to make I did not think that they would need a 'How too ...' blog entry ... but if I make some more, I will certainly consider writing one.

    All the best,

    Bob

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  3. I agree with Tim. The public library is now devoid of the modelling books I knew as a lad and the war gaming section disappeared a couple of years ago.

    Sadly, how to make things out of basswood, card and push pins is becoming something of a lost art - especially fiddly bits like getting symmetrical hull shapes.

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  4. Pat G,

    Point taken. I will probably be building some more 1:1200th-scale ships in the near future, and if I do I will write a 'How to ...' guide.

    The loss of modelling and/or wargames sections in libraries is something to be regretted ... but having a library at all is now becoming something of a rarity so I suppose that one should not be too surprised.

    All the best,

    Bob

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  5. Just a thought Bob - did you consider making your 'monopoly' ships out of a squished tube/pipe? (Apologies if someone has already suggested this.) You could cut a slice of pipe (hull height) and then clamp it to a wooden spacer (the width of the beam) before immersing it in the boiling water. Perhaps the prow and stern might not be as sharp but it might be a lot less fiddly.

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  6. Jfidz,

    Your suggestion has not been made before ... but it makes sense. The only problem I can see is trying to find a suitable piece of polystyrene pipe.

    All the best,

    Bob

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  7. Peter Douglas,

    With all this encouragement it seems that I am going to have to write a 'How to ...' blog entry in the very near future!

    All the best,

    Bob

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  8. Hi Bob,

    Neat, simple and very effective - just the ticket!

    Looking forward to seeing the FP report in due course please!

    All the best,

    DC

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  9. David Crook,

    Simple and robust ... just like me (well, simple anyway!).

    I hope to take my new camera to the game, and if I do I will be writing a suitably illustrated blog entry so afterwards.

    All the best,

    Bob

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  10. Simple and good looking merchant ships, Bob.

    For the issue of the wood absorbing the paint, are you coating it with anything ? I apply Miniwax Wood Hardener to the basswood parts on my ships before painting. Not sure if the brand is is sold in the UK or not, but certainly there must be an equivalent. Stain or varnish should do the trick also.

    Regards,
    Steve

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  11. Corporal_Trim (Steve),

    Many thanks for your kind comment.

    I usually use a coat of neat PVA glue to seal the wood before I paint it, although I have used polyurethane varnish to do the job in the past. Either treatment seems to improve/harden the surface before painting takes place.

    All the best,

    Bob

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  12. Cool, I shall gather yonder ingredients and perhaps illicit the help of my two eldest children while keeping out of the way of the younger third (who is very good at plucking Daddy's 20mm models)

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  13. Geordie an Exiled FoG,

    It does not take much time to make these models ... but the time is spent in short 'bursts' of activity spread (20 to 30 minutes long) across a few days.

    As they take up very little space, it should be possible to keep them away from the inquisitive hands of small children!

    All the best,

    Bob

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